2018 May Awareness Campaign

Fact of the Day

It’s National Women’s Health Week, to celebrate, we bring you facts about caregiver health and well-being:

May 18

Research shows that female caregivers (who comprise about two-thirds of all unpaid caregivers) fare worse than their male counterparts, reporting higher levels of depressive and anxiety symptoms and lower levels of subjective well-being, life satisfaction, and physical health than male caregivers.

Family Caregiver Alliance National Center on Caregiving
https://www.caregiver.org/caregiver-health

May 17

Caregiving can also result in feeling a loss of self identity, lower levels of self esteem, constant worry, or feelings of uncertainty. Caregivers have less self-acceptance and feel less effective and less in control of their lives than noncaregivers.

Family Caregiver Alliance National Center on Caregiving
https://www.caregiver.org/caregiver-health

May 16

Depressed caregivers are more likely to have coexisting anxiety disorders, substance abuse or dependence, and chronic disease. Depression is also one of the most common conditions associated with suicide attempts.

Family Caregiver Alliance National Center on Caregiving
https://www.caregiver.org/caregiver-health

May 15

Estimates show that between 40 to 70% of caregivers have clinically significant symptoms of depression, with 
approximately one quarter to one half of these caregivers meeting the diagnostic criteria for major  depression.
Family Caregiver Alliance National Center on Caregiving
https://www.caregiver.org/caregiver-health

May 14

“Of the 74.5 million children in the United States, an estimated 17.1 million have or have had a psychiatric disorder — more than the number of children with cancer, diabetes, and AIDS combined. Half of all psychiatric illness occurs before the age of 14, and 75 percent by the age of 24.”

https://childmind.org/2015-childrens-mental-health-report/

May 13 – Happy Mother’s Day! Thank you for all that you do!

May 12

“The Most Commonly Diagnosed Mental Health Disorders in Children Are: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (6.8%) was the most prevalent parent-reported current diagnosis among children aged 3–17 years, followed by behavioral or conduct problems (3.5%), anxiety (3.0%), depression (2.1%), autism spectrum disorders (1.1%), and Tourette syndrome (0.2% among children aged 6–17 years).”

Centers for Disease Control Mental Health Surveillance Among Children — United States, 2005–2011
https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/su6202a1.htm

May 11

““The onset of major mental illness may occur as early as 7 to 11 years of age.”

http://www.nccp.org/publications/pub_929.html

May 10

May 9

May 8

“More than 1 in 4 boys of color with disabilities receive an out-of-school suspension.”

May 7

“50% to 70% of youth in the juvenile justice system meet the criteria for a mental disorder and 60% meet the criteria for a substance use disorder.

SAMSHA “Juvenile and Criminal Justice”
https://www.samhsa.gov/criminal-juvenile-justice

May 6

“Youth experiencing migraine with aura were three times as likely to have clinically significant anxiety scores.  Children with chronic daily headache had a higher depression score than the standardized reference population.”

May 5

“Suicidal thoughts and behaviors are common among adolescents and young adults with chronic illness, particularly among those with co-morbid mood disorders. Health professionals should routinely ask about STB during assessments of their adolescent and young adult patients.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28814100

May 4

“50% to 70% of youth in the juvenile justice system meet the criteria for a mental disorder and 60% meet the criteria for a substance use disorder.

SAMSHA “Juvenile and Criminal Justice”
https://www.samhsa.gov/criminal-juvenile-justice

May 3

“Young people with access to mental health services in school-based health centers are 10 times more likely to seek care for mental health or substance abuse than those who do not. 
Child Mind Institute

May 2

“Youth Mental Health is worsening.  Rate of youth with severe depression increased from 5.9% in 2012 to 8.2% in 2015.  Even with severe depression, 76% of youth are left with no or insufficient treatment.” 

The State of Mental Health in America, 2018. http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/issues/state-mental-health-america

May 1

“64.1% of youth with major depression do not receive any mental health treatment. That means that 6 out of 10 young people who have depression and who are most at risk of suicidal thoughts, difficulty in school, and difficulty in relationships do not get the treatment they need.”

2017 State of Mental Health in America – Youth Data” http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/issues/2017-state-mental-health-america-youth-data